Tuesday, 22 November 2016

Autumn deliveries.

I always think of Autumn as the start of the gardening year, it is one of the busiest times of year.
A painful back and hip is the last thing a gardener needs just now!

I had started planting some of the 'many' tulip bulbs purchased and then the order of bare root roses were delivered.
They have been stored, still in their packaging, in the summer house for a few days whilst the gardener and the weather improves.
Today was that day!


There are two standard roses...


...and four shrub roses.

When I originally planted the garden in 2004 there were two standard roses in the front garden which I moved to join two new ones in the main border, now christened The Blue Border.
Sadly they didn't perform too well, they were quite old roses and were eventually removed.
I have always thought the bed lacked the symmetry ( very designer speak ) that having four standard roses provided in the border, not to mention colour.
I decided this summer to plant again, two more standard roses joining, R. Worcestershire, a weeping standard and R. Bonica Std.

The new standard roses are Wisley 2008...



...and Charlotte.



The shrub roses are R. William and Catherine, a white rose that does not grow too tall.  They are destined for the White and Green garden, to compliment the climbing rose, 'Iceberg', which is trained along the dividing fence in this garden.




They are not very much to look at when planted...



The standard roses do provide a little more structure just now.



The three following pictures are from the David Austin website.

R.Wisley 2008. Std

R. Charlotte.Std

R. William and Catherine.
We hope our new additions will look this good next year.
Now to finish the tulip planting!

What's new in your garden this autumn?

Monday, 7 November 2016

Adding Autumn colour.




The autumn colour has been spectacular this year, I think due to the beautiful sunny, dry weather along with no wind or frost to bring the leaves down.

The photo below, of the garden, is taken from the landing window, in early October...



...walking through the garden, the arch into the Blue Garden is covered with the Vine 'Spetchly Red', living up to its name...


...the dahlias are still providing splashes of colour...


...behind the banana bench the green man peers out from among the Boston Ivy, Parthenocissus Tri. Veitch.


In the centre of the right hand bed is the snake bark maple...


...Acer Tegmentosum, which appears to have new buds forming where the leaves are falling off.


Two "ordinary" plants adding to the colour are the Rhus hirta syn. R.typhina, growing in a pot because of its suckering habit...


...and Cotoneaster horizontalis.


In the Oriental Garden...


The sunlight is casting shadows on the Ginkgo biloba...


...and the Acer  cappadocicum 'Aureunm'.


Just starting to change colour is the Acer shirasawanum 'Aureum'....


...and A. palmatum 'Senkaki'.


A. palmatum Dissectum had still maintained its green leaves, these have now fallen.


We have lost a couple of dark leafed Acers over recent years, this prompted a shopping trip to an excellent Acer nursery, Howle Hill, Nr Ross-on-Wye


We came away with a Cotinus Royal Purple...


...Acer palmatum 'Shaina'...


and Acer palmatum 'Jerre Schwartz'.


These two were recommended by the very helpful Andy, to meet our requirements of autumn colour along with being happy growing in a pot.
We seem to have more success with Acers when they are in pots.
What has provided your autumn colour?
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Thursday, 27 October 2016

Autumn Clash of the Titans.

We visited the National Trust property, Charlecote Park in Warwickshire last Friday.
They have an historic fallow deer herd which comprises all four colours of the species - common, menil (the spots are more distinct), melanistic (very dark) and leucistic- almost white.

A group of stags and females grazing by the river.


A group of young males minding their own business... 


...this is one of the almost black ones.


This being the rutting season the mature stags only had one thing on their minds!



Dominance... so they can pass on their genes to the next generation.


Charlecote Park has an interesting house and gardens, well worth visiting at any time of year.

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